The Interplay of the Gunas in the Seeking for Liberation

All actions that start from the fundamental human nature and psychology are grounded in the three Gunas. Thus, as the human individual develops his mental capacities and awareness, and begins his attempt to gain liberation from the bondage of Nature in order to achieve spiritual realisation, it remains the activity of the Gunas that bring about the incremental changes. There is a path for development, but at a certain stage the limitations of the Gunas prevent further progress. It is at this stage that the seeker must find a way to move “beyond the Gunas” for the ultimate freedom of the Self and the Nature.

Sri Aurobindo describes the process: “Sattwa, when it wishes to intensify itself, seeks to get rid of Rajas and calls in the aid of the tamasic principle of inaction; that is the reason why a certain type of highly sattwic men live intensely in the inward being, but hardly at all in the outward life of action, or else are there incompetent and ineffective. The seeker of liberation goes farther in this direction, strives by imposing an enlightened Tamas on his natural being, a Tamas which by this saving enlightenment is more of a quiescence than an incapacity, to give the sattwic Guna freedom to lose itself in the light of the spirit. A quietude and stillness is imposed on the body, on the active life-soul of desire and ego, on the external mind, while the sattwic nature by stress of meditation, by an exclusive concentration of adoration, by a will turned inward to the Supreme, strives to merge itself in the spirit. But if this is sufficient for a quietistic release, it is not sufficient for the freedom of an integral perfection. This liberation depends upon inaction and is not entirely self-existent and absolute; the moment the soul turns to action, it finds that the activity of the nature is still the old imperfect motion. There is a liberation of the soul from the nature which is gained by inaction, but not a liberation of the soul in nature perfect and self-existent whether in action or in inaction.”

Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis of Yoga, Part Four: The Yoga of Self-Perfection, Chapter 9, The Liberation of the Nature, pp. 660-661

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