The Transmutation of the Three Gunas Required for the Integral Perfection

It has long been essentially a dogma of spiritual life that as long as the seeker remains active in the world, he is bound entirely by the action of the three Gunas, ans thus, the only way to achieve true spiritual liberation is to achieve a total quiescent state, wherein the Gunas are perfectly balanced and at rest, not in their normal status of continual change. If this were the only solution, then the integral perfection sought by Sri Aurobindo would not be possible, as all action would be subject to the limitations and weaknesses inherent in the lower nature and the action of the three Gunas. Sri Aurobindo notes: “The divine Being, we may say, may either exist in his silence or act in Nature through her instrumentation, but in that case must put on the appearance of her strife and imperfection.”

At this point, however, Sri Aurobindo diverges from the standard approach: “That may be true of the ordinary deputed action of the Divine in the human spirit with its present relations of soul to nature in an embodied imperfect mental being, but it is not true of the divine nature of perfection. The strife of the gunas is only a representation in the imperfection of the lower nature; what the three gunas stand for are three essential powers of the Divine which are not merely existent in a perfect equilibrium of quietude, but unified ina perfect consensus of divine action.”

Each of the three gunas is a reflection or stepped-down version of a power of the higher existence. “Tamas in the spiritual being becomes a divine calm, which is not an inertia and incapacity of action, but a perfect power, sakti, holding in itself all its capacity and capable of controlling and subjecting to the law of calm even the most stupendous and enormous activity; Rajas becomes a self-effecting initiating sheer Will of the spirit, which is not desire, endeavour, striving passion, but the same perfect power of being, sakti, capable of an infinite, imperturbable and blissful action. Sattwa becomes not the modified mental light, prakasa, but the self-existent light of the divine being, jyotih, which is the soul of the perfect power of being and illumines in their unity the divine quietude and the divine will of action. The ordinary liberation gets the still divine light in the divine quietude, but the integral perfection will aim at this greater triune unity.”

Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis of Yoga, Part Four: The Yoga of Self-Perfection, Chapter 9, The Liberation of the Nature, pp. 661-662

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