The Intuitive Mind and the Vision of the Actualities of the Movement of Time

Sri Aurobindo identifies three aspects or levels of the action of the intuitive mind in relation to the unfolding of things and events through Time.  These are, first, the actual line of development and the unfolding result thereof; second, possibilities that can evolve or influence the action or result; and third, what he calls “imperatives” which operate to create the needed result through the concatenation of forces, people, actions and the pressures of the manifestation in the field of circumstance.

The normal mentality can observe and make projections of likely future events, but these are based on the building up of observations, past experience, and the application of logic or speculation to this basis.  It is however, unable to actually “see” and is therefore subject to error when “unforeseen” circumstances intervene.

Sri Aurobindo describes the vision-process of the intuitive mind observing the actualities of the unfolding reality of the manifestation:  “There is first a primary intuitive action developed which sees principally the stream of successive actualities in time, even as the ordinary mind, but with an immediate directness of truth and spontaneous accuracy of which the ordinary mind is not capable.  It sees them first by a perception, a thought action, a thought sense, a thought vision, which at once detects the forces at work on persons and things, the thoughts, intentions, impulsions, energies, influences in and around them, those already formulated in them and those in process of formation, those too that are coming or about to come into or upon them from the environment or from secret sources invisible to the normal mind, distinguishes by a rapid intuitive analysis free from seeking or labour or by a synthetic total view the complex of these forces, discerns the effective from the ineffective or partly effective and sees too the result that is to emerge.  This is the integral process of the intuitive vision of actualities, but there are others that are less complete in their character.  For there may be developed a power of seeing the result without any previous or simultaneous perception of the forces at work or the latter may be seen only afterwards and the result alone leap at once and first into the knowledge.  On the other hand, there may be a partial or complete perception of the complex of forces, but an incertitude of the definitive result or only a slowly arrive or relative certitude.  These are stages in the development of the capacity for a total and unified vision of actualities.”

Sri Aurobindo, The Synthesis of Yoga, Part Four: The Yoga of Self-Perfection, Chapter 25, Towards the Supramental Time Vision , pp. 868-869

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